Crimes Against Peace

Moreover, if Trump were to have committed a crime in the past, he would have already been punished by the justice and police system in this country. The kind of justice and police system we have in our country is swift when it comes to punishing and clamping down, and slow when it comes to mercy and reprieve. And while in office, presidents do all kinds of things in office, but the most that can happen to them is an impeachment, and as we saw, Trump got impeached twice, but with no results. Mounting investigations is also not a guarantee of a crime, and investigations in this country are more common than sunlight or breathing oxygen. 

And as mentioned before, the domestic political situation reflects the anarchic nature of the international system to a large extent. And as noted by Ronan Farrow, lawlessness and anarchy means the United States is gradually losing the ability to “serve as a bulwark against an increasingly transactional and militarized approach to the world.” And given that “in anarchy there is no automatic harmony” to borrow from Kenneth Waltz, the default position of the major powers is the use of force in order to achieve their goals and objectives. As Waltz wrote:

“A state will use force to attain its goals if, after assessing the prospects for success, it values those goals more than it values the pleasures of peace. Because each state is the final judge of its own cause, any state may at any time use force, all states must constantly be ready either to counter force with force or to pay the cost of weakness. The requirements of state are, in this view, imposed by the circumstances in which all states exist.” 

Hence, the general approach to the international system is essentially divided into two camps or schools virtually everywhere, in the sense that there is one camp or school which views the international system through the prism of anarchy and force, whereas the other camp or school views the international system as something which is evolving through a ‘learning process’ or ‘social process’ that is underpinned by hyperconnectivity and international law. And with growing military and economic equilibrium in the international system in this day and age, it is the camp or school which views the international system through the prism of a learning process or social process underpinned by international law that may have the upper hand. 

For the longest time, force has been “the principle of order in interstate relations” and especially in a modern era. But there is also another principle of order in interstate relations which is beginning to emerge as a result of international law, and that is “faith in justice” which is advanced through “non-violent, social interaction” amongst states that is crystallized in mutually beneficial agreements which are to be forged and carried out in good faith. Since states cannot rely solely on force and “colonial and protectionist practices” to achieve their goals and objectives in an age of growing military and economic equilibrium, they must now “rely” on “faith in justice” as well as a set of “universal moral principles” to come up with agreements that are mutually beneficial through a learning process and social process undergirded by international law. Absent of a learning process and social process undergirded by international law which can absorb the balance of power is the imperatives of the balance of power winning out in the overall scheme of things, and this scenario whereby the imperatives of the balance of power winning out in the overall scheme of things could only be in favor of the rising powers in the international system rather than the status quo powers of the West. Hence, the need to be careful, intelligent, and smart on the part of Western powers when it comes to managing international affairs and international society. 

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